Will things ever get better? A very quick note on optimism

I pretty much have a negative outlook on life, but that’s because when your best friends in college were all books written by dudes who had pretty negative outlooks on life, you kind of adopt their style. I should also add Nietzsche was my favorite philosopher, not because I agreed with him, but because he was so absurdly absurd. So there’s that. I think this negative point of view stems from philosophy requiring you to be cynical of all claims until you can really think over what’s being claimed. In terms of looking at economics and society in general, this means I’m naturally cynical of any claims of optimism.

Sadly, however, the numbers back up my cynicism. How desperately I wish I were just Eeyore, being negative for the sake of being negative. But all statistics, all analysis shows that at the very least, life in the US is regressing. Things are getting worse. Our foreign influence is waning, the middle class is more endangered than the polar bear, and thus far we haven’t seen any major legislative moves to try and prevent these things from happening; if anything, all legislation up to this point has merely maintained the status quo or made it worse.

That being said…

The majority of people under the age of 30 (about 55%) have a mostly favorable view of socialism, whereas about 57% of the same group holds a similar view of capitalism. It doesn’t take a genius to figure out why people under the age of 30 (really under the age of 40) hold a favorable view of socialism; it’s because pure capitalism hasn’t worked. It’s failed and continues to fail. This is an age demographic that grew up watching their parents struggle through the 2008 collapse, or for those who are in their 30s they graduated college only to find no job prospects. So those of us under the age of 40 face no healthcare, have no hope of social security when we reach retirement, have jobs that pay us below what we’re worth, and face a lower standard of living (comparatively speaking) than our parents did. So yeah, we’re a bit miffed.

But that also means that over the next 10-15 years, people my age and younger are going to become the majority voters. Statistics are showing that people in their 30s aren’t becoming more moderate, but rather are staying on the progressive side of economics. As we become the majority, politicians are going to have to adapt a populist economic message, but one that actually works. It’s very likely that in the next 10-15 years, the US will see steps made toward universal healthcare, better worker protections, and tax-payer backed public education. And while the younger generation is no where near perfect on race relations, we do tend to be ever-so-slightly better than previous generations, so we could potentially see an increase in cultural tolerance. But that one is always hard to predict. While that’s not immediate and the lack of immediacy is disheartening, and while no one can predict the future, the fact that people under the age of 40 are remaining consistent in their wants and desires from politicians is good.

So there is hope that things in the US will eventually get better. While I do believe we’re still watching the collapse of our republic, I think that if done correctly we could witness a political and economic revival in the US in the next 10-15 years. I’m not sure that’s the likeliest of outcomes as there are many other factors that could take us off that course, but one can hope, right?

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